THR Blog   /   November 21, 2014

The Hedgehog's Array: November 21, 2014

Noteworthy reads from last week:

“A Rape on Campus: A Brutal Assault and Struggle for Justice at UVA” Sabrina Rubin Erdely

"… at UVA, rapes are kept quiet, both by students – who brush off sexual assaults as regrettable but inevitable casualties of their cherished party culture – and by an administration that critics say is less concerned with protecting students than it is with protecting its own reputation from scandal.”

"Either One: the Video Game that Tries to Simulate Dementia" Michael Thomsen

"The game casts the player as an employee of a futuristic memory-retrieval company called the Ether Institute of Telepathic Medicine. Your job is to dive into the mind of Jean Thompson, a sixty-nine-year-old woman diagnosed with dementia, and retrieve a series of lost memories."

"Why It’s So Hard for Millennials to Find a Place to Live and Work" Derek Thompson

"The paradox of the American Dream: The best cities to get ahead are often the most expensive places to live, and the most affordable places to live can be the worst cities to get ahead."

"Gross Violations" Carol Hay

"Disgust is often used as a tool of persuasion. But are gut feelings ever a reliable guide in questions of right and wrong?"

"What Happened the Last Time Republicans Has a Majority This Huge?" Josh Zeitz

"Since last week, many Republicans have been feeling singularly nostalgic for November 1928, and with good reason. It’s the last time that the party won such commanding majorities in the House of Representatives while also dominating the Senate."

"The New ‘Normal Barbie’ Comes With an Average Woman’s Proportions—And Cellulite Sticker Accessories" Laura Stampler

"A lot of toys makes kids go into fantasy, but why don’t they show real life is cool?"

"Distribution Isn’t Outdated" James Mumford

"G.K. Chesterton offers a non-statist vision for economic and social change that’s still relevant in the age of the iPhone."

"Why Independent Bookstores Are More Than Just Places to Buys Books" David Rosenberg

"They’re a meeting place away from the often segregated, homogenous world of social media."