Schooling in the Age of Human Capital

Daniel Markovits

Metrics do not and, in fact, cannot measure any intelligible conception of excellence at all

Tell Me About Your Mother

Claire Jarvis

The ideal mother, as countless novelists have known, is a dead one.

The Amodernist

Jay Tolson

Péguy’s critical stance toward both broad coalitions made him neither a modernist nor an antimodernist, but something quite distinctive and instructive.

Expletive Defeated

Wilfred M. McClay

We need more profanity? Aren’t we already being inundated with it?

Upcoming Issue Preorder Issue: America on the Brink

Questioning the Quantified Life

Numbers may be our greatest tool, but do we use them wisely?


Of Continuing Interest

A selection of articles from the archives

Unbecoming American

Johann N. Neem

As a child, I thought that to be American was to believe in individuality, to support pluralism and equality, and to celebrate common holidays and eat common foods.

Invisible Science

Steven Shapin

The invisibility of embedded science is an apparently paradoxical, but reliable, index of the significance of science for everyday life—for government, for commerce, and, not least, for our sense of self.

Housework

Mary Townsend

Housekeeping doesn’t just enable us to dwell; housekeeping is dwelling, and also it is thought.

At the Gates of the Labyrinth

Paul A. Komesaroff

Pain and grief are among our most private, isolating experiences.